I have been negligent – bullet updates, but I’ll get around to the major stuff later

Since I fully expect next month to be a slow month, I should be able to catch up a little.

Anyhow:

  • I am installing the Release bits of Microsoft Office 2007. I don’t know if I’ve already plugged CCleaner but I’m doing so again. I needed it because Office 2007 Beta 2 Technical Refresh didn’t uninstall entirely cleanly. An add-on I’d installed after the original install had to be manually removed, but it didn’t show up in my Add/Remove Programs, so CCleaner was instrumental in my being able to find an uninstall the bugger so I could go ahead with the install of the Release version.
  • It turns out that the extended problems I had properly creating the Shared Service Provider portion of MOSS 2007 were due to two factors:
    • I had neglected to complete the MOSS 2007 Beta 2 TR install properly. I’ll go back to that article and add the details in, but instead of running the configuration wizard right away, I should instead have uninstalled Windows Workflow Framework from Add/Remove Programs, installed the .NET 3.0 Framework RC bits and then run the connfiguration wizard.
    • I wasn’t thinking about permissions and rights properly so was creating the app pool for the Web Application that was to support the SSP with Network Service as the ID, which of course has a different PID/GUID on each machine so wasn’t mapping to the Network Service ID on the database server (2-server setup). What I should have done was create the app pool with a domain account ID that had sufficient perms on both boxes and on the SQL Server itself. It never ceases to amaze me how my mind will just drop stuff. This stuff holds for SharePoint 2003 too and I know that cold, but I just didn’t make the leap to apply it to my knowledge of MOSS 2007. Duh.
  • So I need to blog permissions articles that have been popping up on Technet/MSDN lately.
  • I also need to update on my/my company’s progress in fixing (or trying to fix) the Full Text Search in our production deployment of SharePoint 2003. Client still not interested in calling Microsoft Product Support Services. Now it looks like it might have to do with the Cluster configuration and the FTDATA folder. If it isn’t that, not only am I, but my company is tapped out and it is totally time to stop playing political games and djust call Microsoft PSS.
  • There are some links I found to training materials that I’ll also blog (I’ve been doing research on behalf of my client’s Training department).
  • I’ll be working on customizing my company’s portal soon, and doing a little mini-app with a guy based in the Richmond office, so we’ll see how well the development/customization process on MOSS 2007 collaborates. More updates there, hopefully by next week.

Anyway, been terribly busy, too busy, perhaps, to blog, but I’ll try to return to it, because taking notes is important to me, and putting it here means I can find it whereever I have Net access, and maybe it’ll help out other folks too.

Speculation – Further attempted fixes to WSS 2.0 Full Text Search

So the current situation is that despite my past posts about fixes to WSS 2.0/2003 Full Text Search, both my QA and Production environments have Full Text Search enabled, but are/were only returning results for content that pre-existed the fixes.

The Full Text Index actually existed in the SQL Server Content Database (for WSS content), and the MS Search service was running properly on the SQL Server.

Reviewing the best discussion of this sort of thing that I know for steps I might have left out,  I found out that even though WSS 2.0/2003 says it’s got Full Text Search enabled, it may not in fact be enabled.

So you go to SharePoint Central Administration, then click the Windows SharePoint Services link on the left side nav bar, and then click the “Configure Full Text Services” link and even though the checkbox is already enabled, click “OK” anyway, and let the changes be applied and go check the functionality of your search against new content.

Update: This only ended up working for me in our QA environment, which is apparently different in this respect from our Production environment (still b0rked). Oh well, there may be a call to MS support in my future if I continue to be stumped.

And scarily, for me, Full Text Search started working properly, even with new content.

Using UNC Paths to access the “directory structure” in SharePoint 2003 – Requires WebClient service running on your client computer

So for the longest time I couldn’t figure out why on some computers I could use a UNC path to get to SharePoint sites’ resources, and on others I could. Now I think I finally have the answer.

The mechanism is that if you have a WSS site (and Admin privs on that site) at a URL/URI like: http://server/sites/testsite1/, you should be able to open Windows Explorer (not Internet Explorer) and open its UNC path: \\server\sites\testsite1\. If you so so, in Explorer, you should be able to see the full “directory structure” (I put this in quotes because it doesn’t actually exist, but is a figment of your, SharePoint’s and SQL Server’s imaginations), including directory names like “_catalogs”, “_fpdatasources”, “_private”, the ever popular “images”, a directory for non-Document Library, non-Picture Library lists called “Lists”, a folder for each sub-site and a folder for each Document Library or Picture Library, various aspx pages, etc.

Using this UNC Path view, you can do normal file operations, but do be careful, since if you delete a file you probably can’t get it back.

Anyhow, I’d been finding that sometimes this UNC path worked in Explorer and sometimes it didn’t. It didn’t appear to be related to a particular user permissions set or domain login account, but changed computer to computer.

Here’s the error message I’d get when it didn’t work (click to see full size):

WebClient Error
Here’s the kind of folder structure I’d see when it did work (click to see full size):

UNC View
It turned out, after trial and error, that the real difference here was that one computer I was using was running the WebClient service (where the connection worked), and the other wasn’t (where the connection did not).

No, I couldn’t easily find it documented on Microsoft’s support sites.

Office 2007 Beta 2 Reinstall Troubles

Somehow, while uninstalling and reinstalling various bits of Office 2003 and Office 2007 (license/product key management – I am now entirely converted over to my workplace’s Office 2003 Enterprise licenses – this enables me to run my workplace’s Infopath), I have managed to screw up my ability to install Office 2007 Beta 2 and Office 2007 Beta 2 TR2.

Error Screenshot
The error reads:

Microsoft Office Professional Plus 2007 (Beta) encountered an error during setup.
Error 2711: An internal error has occurred. (GraphicsFiltersCDRFilesIntl_1033 )

This error happened while trying to reinstall/uninstall any of the Beta 2 Office 2007 products.

Asking Uncles Google and Live, I found an interesting pointer.

I’ll quote these sources entirely, since the cached article may or may not work in the long term:

  1. From Sue Mosher – Outlook MVP:
    She quotes an article I couldn’t get to come up, but here’s the quote from her in full:
    New information from the Readme at http://officebeta.iponet.net/en-us/products/FX101517941033.aspx#1:Setup fails with Error 2711. An internal error has occurred. (FeatureName)This is usually caused by having a previous or newer version of an Office12 product installed on the machine. Ensure all builds of Office12 products that do not match the build numebr of the product being installed are removed from the machine then attempt the install again.In some cases it has been found that if a newer build has been run over an older build, that after removal of the older builds there is still data remaining in the registry and the MsoCache from the older build. If this is the case follow these steps to clear out the information:1. Open regedit
    2. Browse to HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Office\Delivery\SourceEngine\Downloads
    3. Remove any key that ends in 0FF1CE}
    4. Open C:\MsoCache\All Users
    5. Delete any folder that ends in 0FF1CE}-C
  2. Not finding this information particularly helpful, and reading onward, finding that others didn’t necessarily find it helpful, I moved on, and found this:
    From LelandBartlett:Hi,I had the same error: Error 2711 GraphicsFiltersCDRFilesIntl_1033 when i tried to reinstall office 2007 Beta 2. I did all the recommendations above, plus maybe even more, but still no luck. I have this shareware program; CCLeanup, it has a tool section which is similar to Windows Add/Remove programs; however, even though I removed office 2007, there were 4 programs relating to office 2007 which did not show up in the windows add/remove programs. Three were related to language proofing (3 seperate languages), the other was a MUI for office 2007 beta. I noticed OneNote had it’s own install of a MUI. I ran the uninstall tool with CCLeanup, got rid of each of the four, just rand MS Office 2007 Professional Plus Beta 2 install, it now went in fine.

The tool’s name turns out to be CCleaner, and I checked around with various spyware/malware lists to make reasonably sure it really is free and ad-free (the Wikipedia article on Spyware is a good starting place if you’re doing your own research about programs that might be or you suspect might be adware/spyware). It looks good.

Also? It worked. Do as LelandBartlett says and you should be able to reinstall Office 2007 Beta 2 should you need to. Uninstall everything you can the conventional way, then use CCleaner to uninstall the last 4 components that Microsoft apparently forgot about.