I have been negligent – bullet updates, but I’ll get around to the major stuff later

Since I fully expect next month to be a slow month, I should be able to catch up a little.

Anyhow:

  • I am installing the Release bits of Microsoft Office 2007. I don’t know if I’ve already plugged CCleaner but I’m doing so again. I needed it because Office 2007 Beta 2 Technical Refresh didn’t uninstall entirely cleanly. An add-on I’d installed after the original install had to be manually removed, but it didn’t show up in my Add/Remove Programs, so CCleaner was instrumental in my being able to find an uninstall the bugger so I could go ahead with the install of the Release version.
  • It turns out that the extended problems I had properly creating the Shared Service Provider portion of MOSS 2007 were due to two factors:
    • I had neglected to complete the MOSS 2007 Beta 2 TR install properly. I’ll go back to that article and add the details in, but instead of running the configuration wizard right away, I should instead have uninstalled Windows Workflow Framework from Add/Remove Programs, installed the .NET 3.0 Framework RC bits and then run the connfiguration wizard.
    • I wasn’t thinking about permissions and rights properly so was creating the app pool for the Web Application that was to support the SSP with Network Service as the ID, which of course has a different PID/GUID on each machine so wasn’t mapping to the Network Service ID on the database server (2-server setup). What I should have done was create the app pool with a domain account ID that had sufficient perms on both boxes and on the SQL Server itself. It never ceases to amaze me how my mind will just drop stuff. This stuff holds for SharePoint 2003 too and I know that cold, but I just didn’t make the leap to apply it to my knowledge of MOSS 2007. Duh.
  • So I need to blog permissions articles that have been popping up on Technet/MSDN lately.
  • I also need to update on my/my company’s progress in fixing (or trying to fix) the Full Text Search in our production deployment of SharePoint 2003. Client still not interested in calling Microsoft Product Support Services. Now it looks like it might have to do with the Cluster configuration and the FTDATA folder. If it isn’t that, not only am I, but my company is tapped out and it is totally time to stop playing political games and djust call Microsoft PSS.
  • There are some links I found to training materials that I’ll also blog (I’ve been doing research on behalf of my client’s Training department).
  • I’ll be working on customizing my company’s portal soon, and doing a little mini-app with a guy based in the Richmond office, so we’ll see how well the development/customization process on MOSS 2007 collaborates. More updates there, hopefully by next week.

Anyway, been terribly busy, too busy, perhaps, to blog, but I’ll try to return to it, because taking notes is important to me, and putting it here means I can find it whereever I have Net access, and maybe it’ll help out other folks too.

Office 2007 Beta 2 Technical Refresh (B2TR) and the “The file is not available.” error.

After I applied the Technical Refresh updates to my Office 2007 Beta 2 installs, I started getting this error whenever I tried to open a file with an Office 2007 application (either by double-clicking within the Windows Explorer file list, or by opening the file from within the application):

The file Testing.docx is not available.

So I asked Uncles Google and Live and came up with the comments to Jensen Harris’ blog post about Office 2007 Beta 2 Technical Refresh. In it, a Phil Wright asks about this very same problem. In a comment immediately following is the answer. Apparently the Norton Antivirus Office Plugin is interfering, returning an error code on document scan, which Office then interprets as a virus detection. To fix it you can try to update Norton via Norton’s LiveUpdate (I tried, to no effect), or you can reduce your system’s overall security by disabling the Norton Office plugin. Instructions for older versions of Norton are available in Microsoft KB 329820. In Norton Internet Security 2006 (my version), I opened the Norton status window, then chose Options -> Norton Antivirus, and among the tabs found an option to disable the Office plugin.
This worked fine for me.

Office 2007 Beta 2 Reinstall Troubles

Somehow, while uninstalling and reinstalling various bits of Office 2003 and Office 2007 (license/product key management – I am now entirely converted over to my workplace’s Office 2003 Enterprise licenses – this enables me to run my workplace’s Infopath), I have managed to screw up my ability to install Office 2007 Beta 2 and Office 2007 Beta 2 TR2.

Error Screenshot
The error reads:

Microsoft Office Professional Plus 2007 (Beta) encountered an error during setup.
Error 2711: An internal error has occurred. (GraphicsFiltersCDRFilesIntl_1033 )

This error happened while trying to reinstall/uninstall any of the Beta 2 Office 2007 products.

Asking Uncles Google and Live, I found an interesting pointer.

I’ll quote these sources entirely, since the cached article may or may not work in the long term:

  1. From Sue Mosher – Outlook MVP:
    She quotes an article I couldn’t get to come up, but here’s the quote from her in full:
    New information from the Readme at http://officebeta.iponet.net/en-us/products/FX101517941033.aspx#1:Setup fails with Error 2711. An internal error has occurred. (FeatureName)This is usually caused by having a previous or newer version of an Office12 product installed on the machine. Ensure all builds of Office12 products that do not match the build numebr of the product being installed are removed from the machine then attempt the install again.In some cases it has been found that if a newer build has been run over an older build, that after removal of the older builds there is still data remaining in the registry and the MsoCache from the older build. If this is the case follow these steps to clear out the information:1. Open regedit
    2. Browse to HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Office\Delivery\SourceEngine\Downloads
    3. Remove any key that ends in 0FF1CE}
    4. Open C:\MsoCache\All Users
    5. Delete any folder that ends in 0FF1CE}-C
  2. Not finding this information particularly helpful, and reading onward, finding that others didn’t necessarily find it helpful, I moved on, and found this:
    From LelandBartlett:Hi,I had the same error: Error 2711 GraphicsFiltersCDRFilesIntl_1033 when i tried to reinstall office 2007 Beta 2. I did all the recommendations above, plus maybe even more, but still no luck. I have this shareware program; CCLeanup, it has a tool section which is similar to Windows Add/Remove programs; however, even though I removed office 2007, there were 4 programs relating to office 2007 which did not show up in the windows add/remove programs. Three were related to language proofing (3 seperate languages), the other was a MUI for office 2007 beta. I noticed OneNote had it’s own install of a MUI. I ran the uninstall tool with CCLeanup, got rid of each of the four, just rand MS Office 2007 Professional Plus Beta 2 install, it now went in fine.

The tool’s name turns out to be CCleaner, and I checked around with various spyware/malware lists to make reasonably sure it really is free and ad-free (the Wikipedia article on Spyware is a good starting place if you’re doing your own research about programs that might be or you suspect might be adware/spyware). It looks good.

Also? It worked. Do as LelandBartlett says and you should be able to reinstall Office 2007 Beta 2 should you need to. Uninstall everything you can the conventional way, then use CCleaner to uninstall the last 4 components that Microsoft apparently forgot about.

What is wrong with you Microsoft Only people? – Checksum utilities for verifying large files

So today I am downloading the 2007 Office Beta 2 installs (and whoever heard of paying $1.50 for 5 download tries? I sort of understand, but if it were really just covering bandwidth fees, I should think it would be a lot lower). I note that the download listings/product key e-mails do not come with checksums for these large files.

The files are all in the 75 MiB – 250 MiB range. In UNIX-land, people would as part of the normal posting process just provide checksums. But in Windows-land apparently this is not done. Why not?

Checksums are extremely useful for making sure that the bits you expected to transfer over the network are the ones you got. You can see that this would be useful for both file content verification in the sense of “did I lose any bits along the way that would corrupt my install and can I know it before trying to install and have it fail?” But it’s also useful in the sense of making sure that the bits you want me to download are the same ones I want to get, and assuring that no 3rd party attackers did a man-in-the-middle attack, substituting trojan horses and other nasty things into the install instead. Okay, granted, private key encryption technology would be better than a simple checksum, but a checksum would still be better than nothing, which is what I get when I pay $1.50 to download the damned things.

With that in mind, let me introduce you to NullRiver’s winMd5Sum. This is a free and easy to use utility that allows you to create MD5 checksums on files and also to compare pre-generated checksums to the ones you generate on your end to check the download. Go use it. You’ll like it. While you’re at it, tell your download hosts (Microsoft too, please) that you’d like it if they’d start using it or some similar process to help you verify your large file downloads.

For posterity, I’m going to post the MD5 checksums I’ve got so far for my Office 2007 Beta 2 downloads (from Microsoft via the License Technology Group) [This assumes that each binary isn’t especially constructed for each product key – I guess we’ll see]:

  • Microsoft Office Forms Server 2007 – OFS32-EN.IMG – 14,796,544 bytes – MD5: 4ba65c890b6c86158666b41c3652d2bb
  • Microsoft Office Groove 2007 – OG-EN.EXE – 220,111,048 bytes – MD5: ba497c8610ae774b4f3af92755e83bf7 [Works fine]
  • Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 – OON-EN.EXE – 231,814,328 bytes – MD5: 95750f6b8c48c602b39c4b1271913398 [Works fine]
  • Microsoft Office Outlook 2007 with Business Contact Manager – BCM-EN.EXE – 252,769,672 bytes – MD5: 9cb44475cfbbbebb7c84eced9ef6e437 [Works fine]
  • Microsoft Office Professional Plus 2007 – OPPLUS-EN.EXE – 461,881,224 bytes – MD5: 7fc65a38b6bd9dce0563afea2c5b9a93 [Works fine]
  • Microsoft Office Project Professional 2007 – OPP-EN.EXE – 210,237,736 bytes – MD5: 50c1f917637de95c9aa72114e6385acb [Works fine]
  • Microsoft Office SharePoint Designer 2007 – SPD-EN.EXE – 236,994,544 bytes – MD5: 94fe6551b52ef1d38556d76677966073 [Works fine]
  • Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 – Enterprise – SPS32-EN.IMG – 308,555,776 bytes – MD5: 0db4750dd73faca499fc5df95c7f63b3
  • Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 for Search – OSS-EN.IMG – 231,387,136 bytes – MD5: c1c2b5ed9c0a31c48fb59afe3fb29919
  • Microsoft Office Visio Professional 2007 – OVP-EN.EXE – 293,966,312 bytes – MD5: 4259e1f323509e8392143e20416490f5 [Works fine]
  • Microsoft Windows SharePoint Services [v3] – SharePoint_setup.exe – 78,849,224 bytes – MD5: 51cd9f824bb5b6bfc90b96f0de956a1b

This is the complete list of the downloads I paid for.

Also, FYI, here is the link for the Beta 2 Technical Refresh download.

Here’s the file info for that download:

  • Microsoft Office 2007 Beta Two Technical Refresh – office2007b2tr-kb000000-fullfile-en-us.exe – 518,733,856 bytes – MD5: 9ad077c27fb279516b8636e43c3e0463 [Works fine]

I haven’t verified that all of these files work, but I have verified that the total file size is the same as was originally reported when I initiated the download, which is as close as you can get without MD5 or other checksum tools. I’ll note by striking the item out if for some reason the download is corrupt. Also, when I say [Works fine], I mean that it installed fine with all options installed to run on the drive. I won’t say that the actual programs installed worked fine, as they are in Beta.